Rape Crisis Domestic Violence Safe Haven

Safe Haven provides prevention, intervention, support, and advocacy to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and stalking in Ashland County 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Programs include: 24 hour hotline, emergency shelter, case management, court advocacy, hospital advocacy, campus advocacy, support groups, individualized safety planning, resources and information, outreach, and prevention education.

You're Not Alone

In the event of domestic violence or sexual abuse, you are not to blame.  Safe Haven takes the time to listen to your story, because be we believe you. We are on your side.  We accept people of all ages and genders, races, and identities without judgment. 

If you are a survivor

Get to a safe place and call someone for help.

  1. Call or meet with an advocate. Our office can be reached at 419-282-6097 or our 24/7 hotline at 419-289-8085.
  2. We can meet you somewhere safe. If you feel as though you cannot come to us, one of our trained advocates will meet at a neutral, safe place
  3. We’ll figure out where to go from here. Next steps in this process can be scary. Our biggest priority is your health and safety. We’ll work with you to figure out what’s next.
  4. Get the support you need. We stand by you and help you lead a healthier life as you get the care you need.

If you or someone you know has experienced domestic violence, you are not alone. Contact us via our 24-hour crisis hotline at 419-289-8085 to speak with a trained advocate or visit safehavenofashland.org for more information. If you are in immediate danger, please call 911.

Our program is a member of the Ohio Domestic Violence Network and Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence and considered a Rape Crisis Center in the State of Ohio.

The Safe Haven program is funded in part by United Way of Ashland County.

Domestic Violence 

  • Emotional abuse, where one person plays mind games with and controls his or her partner, or makes the partner feel humiliated.
  • Spiritual abuse, when one partner uses the Bible to manipulate and control the other’s behavior, or to justify the physical abuse.
  • Financial abuse, or restricting your access to money or a job, and making a person ask for money to spend on food, clothing or entertainment.
  • Mental abuse involves controlling a person’s ability to think for herself. A partner that isolates you from your family, damages your or someone else’s personal property, or waves weapons around to intimidate you—these are all examples of mental abuse.

Sexual Abuse

Defining sexual abuse and violence can be confusing. You may have been experiencing this type of abuse for years and haven’t even known it. Your partner may lean towards one type of abuse over others. Be aware of this kind of behavior:

    • Unwanted touching or touching you against your will
    • Pressing you for sexual relations
    • Threatening consequences if you do not engage in sexual contact
    • Ignoring you after you say "no"
    • Posting nude photos/videos of you without your consent
    • Forcing you to relive past sexual experiences

Taking action after sexual abuse can save a life. Aside from the emotional trauma, there are also physical health issues to consider. If you or someone you know has been a victim of sexual assault and/or rape we strongly encourage you to step forward, get medical attention immediately, and start your road to recovery.

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Recent Updates

Celebrating the Deeper Message of the Holidays this Season

COVID-19 has changed how we celebrate this year. I encourage you to think of ways to use the technology available to make these holidays special. Use a social media app to get family together and make a craft. Send out the list of needed supplies and let everyone get what they need before the meeting. Read stories to your grandchildren over the phone or computer. Use the same to Share stories of Christmases past. Use the Netflix party app to remotely watch a holiday movie together and chat. There are still ways to celebrate this season. Find creative ways to adapt. It will help manage the loneliness you may be dealing with this year.

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Stress Management Practices for the Holidays

This week is a week where many of us are celebrating holidays or holy days, Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanza are on many of our minds. Rather than allowing these special days to become stressful by focusing on planning and getting tasks done, focus on the relationships and deeper the meaning of each celebration. The deeper message in all of these holidays can give us hope and strengthen our resilience. Allow them to enrich your faith while you treasure the people in your life whom you love. 

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Managing Holiday COVID-19 and Post-Election Stress

With COVID-19 affecting our holidays, schools going more and more remote, and the lingering post-election stress it is important to ask ourselves questions that help us manage our stress response.   The Greater Good Science Center poses a few questions to help us think about how we are managing and reacting got what is going on around us (Smith & Suttie 10.2020).

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